Less Can Be More

March 20, 2013

Can you say what you want to say in 140 characters or less? Do you believe less is more? If the answer is “YES” then twitter is for you. Twitter allows you to update your followers from anywhere you can get to the internet, which means access to a lot of people throughout the day. Twitter has evolved into a major social media player. As a business, you can use Twitter to attract potential clients and lead them to your other content on the internet such as your website, other platforms, and your bricks and mortar business, if you have one. Twitter can also facilitate excellent customer relations as well as help avoid poor customer relations. You must plan your campaign and create quality posts that interest people and make them want to follow you.

We’ve given you 4 details to consider, so you’re not just tweeting blind!

  • DEFINE YOUR PURPOSE AND GOALS
    If your primary goal is to drive people to your website, Twitter isn’t the platform for you. People on twitter want conversation with real people, not just to be pushed to your site. Do you want to keep customers aware of your daily specials or events you’re planning? Your goal is to establish yourself as an expert in your industry. Plan your campaign to include all of your social media platforms, blog as well as your website.
  • ASSIGN THE RIGHT PEOPLE TO TWEET
    The person in charge of your tweets should be knowledgeable and dedicated to listening to your community chatter. They should understand the culture in your company and be someone you are comfortable with talking about your brand. It’s very important on Twitter to respond to messages in a timely manner. That’s what users expect. Real people want to know they are talking to other real people. If your company name is your twitter handle, you should list in your profile the name of those responsible for tweeting. Employees can identify themselves by including a carrot (˄) and their initials, such as ˄KD.
  • FOLLOW THE RIGHT PEOPLE:
    Quality outweighs quantity. Find connectors who post relevant content you will want to retweet with our followers. Look for people who post frequently about your business. Use the search bar often to see if anyone new is tweeting you want to follow.
  • HAVE A SENSE OF HUMOR:
    Twitter is a perfect place for your company’s personality to come through. Don’t be afraid to use humor, as long as it is business appropriate.

These are just a few basics to get you started. Once you start tweeting you can find a wealth of people to follow. Businesses have come up with very creative ways to say more with less, and customers appreciate that! If you want to learn more, we invite you to our social media seminar on April 3rd, 11:30am-12:30pm. Give us a call for more details (432)218-6736

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History of Advertising Pt.2

February 13, 2013

Last week we looked at the history of advertising from the early Egyptians through the beginning of radio and TV commercials. Advertising in the 70’s became more emotional and advertisers began to use clever phrases and melodies to capture the consumer’s attention which helped make the advertising message more memorable. Some of the greatest jingles came out of the 70’s. See if you can remember a few of these from Dr. Pepper, Oscar Myer, Coca-Cola and Slinky.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jvCTaccEkMI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rmPRHJd3uHI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q8H5263jCGg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X41Tq3svxNY

The late 1980’s and early 1990’s saw the introduction of cable television and by the end of the 90’s the internet opened a new frontier of advertisers. By 2000, search engines like Google and Yahoo offered new ways to advertise by specifically targeting what  the user  was searching for in their search engine. This type of interactive advertising lead to the new genre of advertising, Social Media.

Social Media is a type of advertising that involves unusual approaches to facilitate encounters with potential consumers. This type of advertising causes consumers to buy the product or idea. This idea furthers the trend of interactive and “embedded” ads, such as via product placement, having consumers vote through text messages, and various innovations utilizing social network services such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and more.

In the 1020’s the main source of advertising for a new business was newspaper, signs on street cars and outdoor posters. By 1998, television and radio stood as a main way advertising dollars were spent by a business. The future is now the internet and unlimited possibilities it holds to market a business, not just locally, but  worldwide.  As we have seen throughout the past, advertising is always changing and at a faster pace that ever before. This can make keeping ahead of the trends even more difficult, but more important than ever.

A large majority of business owners find it difficult to have the time to run their business and successful marketing and advertising campaigns. Let SDB Creative Group give you some time back. Give us a call today!

If you manage a social media budget you quickly realize providing accurate measurements to show ROI isn’t always easily done, especially if you’re just beginning to build your brand. Logically, you begin tracking your new likes, followers & +1’s. It only seems obvious that is a great way to measure you success, right? Not only do you have to build this audience, you have to keep this audience, and that can be even more difficult

You can spend many complicated hours deciding what metrics will work for you, and depending on your company’s goals, you may need the complicated formulas. But, for a simple approach there are a few basics that must be part of any measurement process and these are what we’ll talk about today.

1. Volume is the “size of the conversation” about your brand or campaign. This is a great indicator of interest, and requires more than just counting tweets and wall posts. Measure the number of messages about your brand and people talking about your brand. Are there days or times when people are talking more about your brand? This is information you can use to focus more of your posts during these times. Did you seem to lose several after a specific post or tweet? Maybe after examining that content you’d find there are certain topics not interesting or too controversial for your audience.

2. Reach is the measure of potential audience size or how many friends or followers you have. Although this is an important number to watch, it misses a lot of important information in assessing your social media effectiveness. You may have 500 friends, but if you’re only reaching 100, you may want to rethink when your posting.

3. Engagement shows if and how people are engaged with your brand and participating in the conversation. This is when you look at our content and decide if you are “interesting” enough to keep your audience. If people aren’t engaged with our brand by likes, comments, shares or replies eventually your brand won’t show up in their Facebook news feed at all. Pay attention to what content generates interest and be sure to keep those types of topics in your posts.

4. Share of Voice: To really understand how you’re doing with your social media, you have to know how your conversations compare to your competitors. Visit their pages and watch what they and their audience are discussing.
Being consistent is essential to effective social media measurement. Measure monthly by the same formulas and tools. Tracking your numbers over a period of time and pay attention to how they change.

Lately, there’s been a lot of focus on ‘social media’. Businesses are clamoring to create Facebook and Twitter pages and get their messages out to the masses. While we agree that social media is important, the question you should be asking yourself is, “Is social media important for my business?’ Just like people, all businesses are different. The medium with which you spread your message will be different, too.

“Traditional Media”
With the rise of social media, ‘traditional media’ has emerged as the go-to name for mediums like radio, television, newspaper, billboard; those mediums that up until about 3 years ago (more or less in different parts of the world) drove the advertising world. While digital/internet advertising has grown, it’s easy to forget that traditional media still helps drive prospective customers to your product or service. People are still watching television. Radios still come standard in all vehicles. Newspapers (whether printed or online) are still being read. You are still seeing billboards on your commute to work.

The key to traditional media, in this digital and social world, is knowing your customer, knowing their lifestyles, knowing their buying habits. Once you’ve figured that out, you’re one step closer to knowing where they will see your message.

How do you learn about your customer? ASK THEM QUESTIONS! Why wouldn’t you want to know where your customers come from? Why wouldn’t you want to know their radio-listening or TV-watching habits? I’ve walked into plenty of stores and been asked, ‘How did you hear about us?’ They are doing their research. If they have put money into radio and nobody mentions radio, then why would they continue to use it? Doing simple research can help you determine, to a better extent, where to focus your advertising budget.

Enter ‘Social’
So, you’ve figured out who your customer is and how they respond to certain traditional advertising means. Now, should you use social media?

When thinking about social media, most business owners think that it’s just something to do. Something that isn’t that important. Something that can be done as an afterthought. This is dangerous. Allowing interns or ‘the girl at the front desk’ to manage your social media presence could be worse than having any social media presence at all. Unlike traditional, social is constant. It’s a 24/7 message about your company. You don’t let interns handle your business, you shouldn’t allow them to handle social media.

Social media is important to your brand and it should be handled as such. What can social do for your company? Social media offers an alternate outlet to promote your message. By coupling social with your traditional campaign, you’re amplifying that message, which can only help. In addition, because social IS social, there are more opportunities for your business to be shared, liked or talked about. Who wouldn’t want that?

But, before you jump into social, ask yourself these questions:
Does my business need to be social? If you’re a retail store or restaurant, your answer is already YES. If you’re not on social, you’re behind. But, if you’re a sign company, you may not have a huge audience to begin with, so investing time in social, may not be the best use of resources.

Do I have the time to commit to social media? Social isn’t to be taken lightly. If you’re going to have a presence, it can’t be an afterthought. It must be done and done consistently.

Will I be consistent – posting daily or at least 3-4 times per week? If you’re jumping on social, you must be SOCIAL. If you post consistently for days, weeks, months and then get busy and leave your page silent for days, weeks, months, you’ve lost any momentum that you had gained. Social is quick, instant and constant. People are online at all times of the day, sometimes all day. In order to be seen and remembered, you must stay active.

Can I handle being engaging – answering questions or complaints? Again, because it’s the nature of the beast, social gives consumers the outlet to engage with businesses like never before. They ask questions – Do you have this in stock? What colors does ABC come i? How much is it? They also post praise and complaints. Are you ready to deal with this?

Once you’ve answered those questions, you’re ready to at least dip your toe in the water.

Considering there are more than 800 million people on Facebook, we’d say that either way, having some kind of social presence can’t hurt.

Need some help? SDB Creative Group is a full-service marketing firm offering complete traditional, digital and social solutions for businesses of all sizes. Give us a call to set up a consultation – 432.218.6736 or email us at info@sdbcreativegroup.com.

Written by:
Danita Maldonado, Director of Social Media, danita@sdbcreativegroup.com
@danitalicious

Connect with SDB Creative Group here:
www.sdbcreativegroup.com

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www.twitter.com/sdbcreative

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Our Director of Social Media, Danita Maldonado, has been busy checking out the new Google social network, Google+. She blogged about it and would love for you to check it out.

Check it out by clicking here.

Feel free to contact Danita:

Or at danita@sdbcreativegroup.com

If you’d like for her to send you a Google+ invite, email her at danitalicious@gmail.com.

Our marketing must (#6) this week is Public Relations. What is public relations? It can include press releases, getting articles written for or about you. It can be events, such as trade shows, parties or benefits for your clients. It also includes networking with trade associations and community groups – Chambers of Commerce, Rotary, Toastmasters, etc.

Most companies do not have a public relations effort, but it’s not hard to put together a highly effective, cohesive one. It can work miracles for building your brand and fame, especially with the prominence of the internet.

One story on the news or article in the paper can propel your name forward overnight, compared to a regular advertising campaign that takes several months to mature.

Some statistics show that over 80% of news is placed. Think about how many real news days there are in west Texas. Not many. Take advantage of this by helping the reporters do their job, and at the same time build your brand.

Shane Boring
shane [at] sdbcreativegroup dot com
sdbcreativegroup.com
sdbsociallink.com

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